Skip to main content

Honeymoon: You Say Quinoa, I Say Keweenaw


We didn't find any copper so we moved onto our next destination. 

Our tour guide said that there was still about half the deposit left. You'd have to be a daredevil-diving-mine spelunker to get anything out. Everything below the floor we were in is flooded.

Scott was excited to check out the town of Calumet. We parked downtown and paid 5 cents to park for an hour. Deal of the Century!

The entitre downtown is a national historic park. It was the copper capital of the world, but has seen better days.

The fire station is connected to the Calumet Theatre. I wish we would've went inside.

After a little while we walked on back to our car to head on north.

 On the way out I saw this old man sitting on this stoop. He made me wonder what the difference between a beautiful, but derelict small town like Calumet and say Detroit. You couldn't imagine the NPS declaring Detroit a national park, could you?


I had read about how there were abandoned ghost towns in the woods in our Moon Michigan book. I thought they were like a secret thing, but it was actually run by the historical society. 

"In 1854, John Shawson, an agent of the Cliff Mine, discovered native copper in the bottom of an ancient pit (apparently dug by Native Americans) several miles from Cliff Mine. The Central Mining Company was organized in 1854 for the purpose of mining copper in the Keweenaw. Mining began in 1856, and the mine's lode proved so rich that Central was able to turn a profit in its first year of operation. Between 1856 and between then and the end of the 19th century the company built over 130 structures for the mine and the community of workers. At the peak of production in 1868, the town of Central was home to over 130 people, primarily immigrants from Cornwall, England. The mining industry eventually contracted, and by 1887 the Central Mine was the only fully operational mine in Keweenaw County. In 1898 the mine ceased operation, and residents began leaving the town. The last permanent resident left in 1952, although some structures in the area are still used as summer cottages."


Despite being a less ghost town and more abandoned city museum, it was cool to walk around the city and see all the old buildings and the rubble left behind.


As you can see from the view above the view is a stunner. I can see why people vacation here.

We walked most of it even though you could see almost everything by car. The map we had was kind of confusing.


This open area was where one of the shafts was. 

These arctic plants crunched beneath our feet as we crossed the field.

No. 2 hoist


Clerk's House

Another occupied private summer home.

Boarding House


We then drove all the way to the tip which is the beginning of US 41. This was special to me because 41 runs next to my hometown and I've taken it many times. I had no idea it took you all the way to Miami, FL. 

We were going to eat at this German restaurant, but everything was more than $20.

When we saw that it was only 1,990 miles to  Miami a part of us was tempted to go there. We did still have a week left of our trip. 



We took the shoreline back and stopped at this wayside/picnic area. 





Because it was near the tip we thought we take some we're at the edge of the world and we know it pics.


Again I wish we had gone swimming.

Brooke was afraid of the rocks, so we didn't dive in.

We stopped back in Calumet for dinner.

This time we drove through the national park and entrance and were impressed by the fortress like entrance created by the large buildings along the edge of town. On that side of downtown there were less abandoned buildings. Everything looked pristine until you reached this Woolworth's turned Family Dollar.

I'd totally live here or Marquette. Brooke couldn't handle the 150 plus inches of snow.

There wasn't a whole lot in this town, but we did find a pretty good Mexican restaurant and the beer was super cheap.

That's a Keweenaw Widow Maker. Good, but not great.

Scott "interviewed" our waiter who grew up here with all his questions about the town and peninsula. 

Carmelita's was a great find and it was interesting to note that the city has embraced the national historic park designation. It's taking a long time to rehab and occupy all the buildings, but it's an overall plus for the city.

As we went on our way we passed one of the NPS buildings.

On the way out of the peninsula we passed the Quincy Mine again.

Then we drove into the sunset and ended our Michigan portion of our trip.

I really want to come back here next time we're anywhere near the UP.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Marina's Twin Cities Birthday Weekend

Our niece Marina was turing 11 and had one request: a weekend in Minneapolis with her favorite cousin, Meadow. Marina made these masks for them. You know this cat lover was excited.  We walked over to Kiniko Kids and they had a Ghibli cookbook.  Meadow wanted this mushroom hat.  Since ice skating season ended early we still wanted to get one last skate in.  Theo tried out his new skates, which needed some adjustments.

An Appalachian Hipcamp Road Trip: A MKE and O-HI-O pitstop on the way to Tawney Farm, West Virginia

Day 1  Scott had gotten a lucky gig to check out some off the beaten path campsites for Hipcamp. Our trip was going to bring us to the Appalachians. We packed our car full and headed east "early" Friday morning. Early for us is never that early, but at least we got out on the road at a decent hour. While driving through Madison we stopped at Cabela's to pick up a few more supplies that we would need. Our original plan was to make it to Indiana Sand Dunes tonight. Scott mentioned that if we drive through Milwaukee we could skip the Chicago tolls. I agreed and then he asked if we could stop in Cudahy to say hi to the folks. I said we might as well stay the night.  When we got there we went to Tsing Tao with my dad, my childhood favorite restaurant. It's in an old Ihop and has a great buffet at any time of the day.  Sorry Scott, I wasn't impressed. That's because your pretentious. Anyways, Meadow decided she didn't want t

Backcountry Camping with Kids in Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Day 1  Back in May I stumbled upon Theodore Roosevelt National Park. I had no idea there was a National Park in North Dakota and that it was the northern end of the Badlands. Usually our summer vacations coincide with Scott's work trips. Since he didn't have any this summer I thought we should take advantage of actually taking a vacation. What, my workcations are always classics? I suppose a second real vacation this year wouldn't hurt. We definitely have more time than normal. As long as we took Covid-19  precautions and avoided people. We finally settled on a time to go. Blake joined us so we borrowed our dad's van so we could ride together. Scott had just driven from Michigan the day before. Blake had met my parents in Wisconsin to get the van and then drove from Duluth to pick us up. I offered to drive since I literally only drive twice a month.  I was still pretty tired from a long drive home. Since we were near Fergus Falls we had to stop by the abandoned state ho